Procedures and Regulations

Absences

If a student is absent from class due to illness or other unforeseen circumstances, they should contact professors directly to notify them of the absence and to make up missed assignments. If a student is unable to contact professors and/or anticipates an extended absence from classes, they (or an emergency contact) should be in communication with the assistant dean of student life and spiritual formation and the registrar, who will contact professors on their behalf.

Academic Review Board

The Academic Review Board comprises the associate dean of faculty and academic affairs, the associate dean of admissions and financial aid, the registrar, the directors of contextual education, the assistant dean of student life and spiritual formation, and two area chairpersons.

Academic Standing

At the conclusion of each semester, Candler’s Academic Review Board reviews the academic progress of all MDiv, MRL, MRPL, MTS, and ThM students. DMin student academic standing is determined by the director of the DMin program in consultation with the academic dean. ThD student academic standing is determined by the ATA ThD Committee.

MDiv, MRL, and MTS students whose term or cumulative grade point average falls below 2.0; ThM and MRPL students whose term or cumulative grade point average falls below 3.0; and students who receive an F or U in any course normally are placed on probation. Those who routinely withdraw from courses and those who receive a grade of C or lower in a course taken to fulfill a degree requirement will be placed on probation.

Students placed on probation must reduce their academic course load. Students on probation cannot take letter-grade courses on an S/U basis, enroll in directed studies, or receive an incomplete grade the following semester. Students may be on probation for no more than three semesters.

Failure of MDiv students to achieve a 2.0 term average for three semesters, MRL and MTS students to achieve a 2.0 term average for two semesters, and ThM and MRPL students to achieve a 3.0 term average, and those who fail to make satisfactory academic progress may result in discontinuance. Discontinuance also may result from failure to complete courses taken to fulfill degree requirements with a C grade or better after more than one attempt, and failure to make satisfactory academic progress.

To serve on standing committees at Candler, students must be in good academic standing at the time of their election and during the period of their service. Serving on committees, while an important contribution to the life of Candler, should neither interfere with class attendance nor adversely affect academic work in other ways. To be eligible for selection for courses and programs that require significant travel, students must be certified to be in good academic standing by the Candler Registrar. This includes all Candler-sponsored international programs and Candler-sponsored internships.

Alcohol and Drug Abuse Policy

http://policies.emory.edu/8.8

Emory University is committed to the health and well-being of its faculty, staff, and student body. Alcohol and drug misuse and abuse can be detrimental to one’s overall physical and emotional health; academic and/or professional performance; and adversely impact family, friends, and coworkers.

As a recipient of federal grants and contracts, Emory University adheres to the provisions of the Drug-Free Workplace Act of 1988 and the Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act Amendments of 1989. As administrator of certain state-funded financial aid programs for students, Emory University also adheres to Georgia’s Drug- Free Postsecondary Education Act of 1990.

This policy is also designed to convey the university’s care and concern for its members and their well-being, given that alcohol and other drug misuse on college campuses is a major public health concern. In order to foster academic achievement, personal success and wellness, and to promote the safety of the community, the university has adopted the following tenets to guide the prevention of alcohol and other drug misuse:

  • Emory University complies with and upholds all applicable federal, state, and local laws related to alcohol, illicit drugs, and controlled substances. Violations of such laws that come to the attention of university officials may be addressed within the university or through prosecution in the courts, or both.
  • The university strives to create an environment that supports individuals who choose not to use alcohol and individuals who choose to use alcohol legally and in moderation. The illegal sale, distribution, or use of alcohol is not permitted.
  • The university encourages individuals with prescription medications to safely and legally use such medications in compliance with their prescriptions. The misuse of prescription medication or other controlled substances is not tolerated.
  • The sale, distribution, or use of illegal drugs is not permitted.
  • The university seeks to create an environment of personal development and supportive community. It supports individuals seeking services for alcohol, tobacco, and/or other drug misuse and makes confidential services available to them.
  • In instances where individuals are found to be in violation of the university’s Alcohol and Drug Abuse Policy, the university’s response will stress individual accountability, personal development, and connection to appropriate health services as well as the effect on impacted parties and the community.
  • Emory is a tobacco-free campus. The use or sale of tobacco products in or on Emory-owned or Emory-leased property is prohibited. See Policy 4.113 Tobacco-Free Environment for more information (http://policies.emory.edu/4.113), including resources for tobacco cessation.

Americans with Disabilities Policy

It is the policy of Emory University to ensure that all of its goods, services, facilities, privileges, advantages, and accommodations are accessible to persons with disabilities in accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) of 1990, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and other pertinent federal, state, and local disabilities anti-discrimination laws. Reasonable accommodation(s) will be made on an individual basis.

It is the responsibility of persons with disabilities to seek available assistance and establish their need(s). Persons with disabilities who may require assistance or accommodation(s) from Emory University must complete the self-identification form and return it to the Office of Accessibility Services, 1946 Starvine Way, Suite 310, Decatur, GA 30033. The information provided will be used only to assist the university and OAS in determining accommodation needs. Self-identification forms are available from the Candler admissions office at 404.727.6326, or from OAS at 404.727.9877 or 404.712.2049 (TDD).

Application for Degree

Students must apply formally for their degrees before the deadline stated in the academic calendar. The application for degree is available in OPUS during a window of time set by the university registrar each semester. A separate application is required for each degree received.

Students who file an application after the deadline must pay a special processing fee of $25. These students cannot be assured that their names will appear in the commencement program or that their diplomas will be available at commencement.

August and December graduates participate in graduation the following May. Graduates and candidates who will not be attending the Candler diploma ceremony must notify the Candler registrar at candlerregistrar@emory.edu.

Change of Address

Students with name, address, or telephone number changes are required to update their information via OPUS (http://opus.emory.edu). Candler and the university use the contact information in OPUS for billing and other important matters.

Complaints

Situations may arise in which a student believes that he or she has not received fair treatment by a representative of Candler or has a complaint about the performance, action, or inaction of a member of the staff or faculty, affecting the student. A student who wishes to register a complaint with the School related to issues of discriminatory harassment, grades, or compliance with the accreditation standards of the School’s accrediting bodies should follow the Complaint Procedure below.

Students are encouraged to seek assistance from the dean of faculty and academic affairs for any other complaints involving classes or faculty members; and from Associate Dean Anne Burkholder for other matters.

Federal financial aid laws and regulations require that each state have a process to review and act on complaints concerning educational institutions in the state. If you have a complaint, you may, of course, file a complaint with Emory’s financial aid office or call the Trust Line at 1-888-550-8850 or file a report online at http://mycompliancereport.com/EmoryTrustLineOnline. You may also file a complaint about Emory University with the State of Georgia Office of Inspector General by following the directions at the Office of Inspector General (OIG) website. In the event that OIG receives a student complaint relating to financial aid, it will be forwarded to the Office of Inspector General of the US Department of Education.

Association of Theological Schools (ATS)

The Commission on Accrediting of the Association of Theological Schools has a policy regarding complaints against member schools regarding noncompliance with ATS accreditation standards, policies, and procedures. Student complaints relating to the accrediting standards of the commission may be communicated in writing to the academic dean, who will investigate the complaint and provide a written response to the complainant within 30 days of the receipt of the complaint. A record of all such complaints will be maintained in the Office of the Academic Dean for review by the Board of Commissioners upon request.

Complaints may also be made directly to the ATS, in which case they must be filed in writing (to the Association of Theological Schools in the United States and Canada, the Commission on Accrediting, 10 Summit Park Drive, Pittsburgh PA 15275‐1110) and must provide evidence that the member school is in violation of a stated policy or accrediting standard or a membership criterion. (To access the commission’s complaint policy, please see section XII of Commission Procedures, http://ats.edu/uploads/accrediting/documents/commission-policies-and-procedures.pdf, p. 29).

Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges (SACSCOC)

Complaints regarding noncompliance with SACS accreditation standards, policies, and procedures may be made to SACSCOC, 1866 Southern Lane, Decatur, GA 30033‐4097. (To access the commission’s complaint policy, procedures, and its complaint form, please see http://sacscoc.org/pdf/081705/complaintpolicy.pdf).

Allegations of Discriminatory Harassment

Any student or employee with a complaint of discriminatory harassment should contact the director for equal opportunity programs to obtain information on the procedure for handling such complaints. Any questions regarding either this policy statement or a specific fact situation should be addressed to the Emory University Office of Equity and Inclusion at 404.727.9867. For more information about the Office of Equity and Inclusion, visit http://eop.emory.edu (see page 95).

Grade Appeals

Each student has the right to appeal a grade after every attempt has been made to resolve such grievances directly among the persons involved. If those parties cannot achieve a satisfactory resolution, an appeal may be submitted in writing to the academic dean within six months of the assignment of the grade. See the grade appeal process page.

Completion of Studies

MDiv, MRL, and MTS students must complete their programs of study within six calendar years. MRPL students must complete their programs of study within five calendar years. Normally, the DMin degree is completed in three years. In the unlikely event that a DMin student is unable to finish the program on the typical schedule, the degree must be completed within four calendar years. The ThM degree must be completed in no more than two years. ThD students must complete their program of study within nine years. Continuation beyond that time is permitted only by approval of special petitions based on extraordinary circumstances.

Course Load

During the academic year, enrollment of at least 12 hours per semester is considered full time for MDiv and special students. For MRL, MRPL, MTS, ThM, and ThD students, enrollment of 9 hours per semester is considered full time. DMin students are considered part time. For a student in any program (except the DMin) to be considered fully enrolled for tuition assessment and scholarship purposes, a minimum of 12 hours per semester is required. Students in the first semester of the MDiv program may enroll in a maximum of 15 hours. The maximum course load in the school of theology for all other students (i.e., MRL, MRPL, MTS, ThD, ThM, and MDiv students from their second semester onward) is 16 hours per semester. DMin students enroll in 5 to 7 hours each semester. The only exception to the 16 hour credit limit is for those students who enroll in a January/August course. Students enrolling in January/August courses who also are enrolled in a CE (Contexual Education) course may take a maximum of 18 credit hours.

During the summer term, the maximum course load for MDiv, MRL, MTS, and special students is 12 credit hours. The maximum summer course load for MRPL students is 6 credit hours. Generally, students may not register for more than one three-hour course per term for the summer semester. Credit hour overloads may be granted only to final semester students who need additional credits in order to graduate. All requests for credit hour overload should be made via email to the academic dean.

Students with extensive outside employment, students on academic probation, students who repeatedly withdraw from classes, and students with incomplete coursework from previous semesters may be required to reduce their course loads.

Criminal Background Checks

Candler School of Theology will screen all those admitted to degree and nondegree programs by requiring and facilitating a criminal background check at the expense of the student (approximately $18) through a vendor designated by the school. Criminal background checks should be completed by August 15 for fall enrollees, December 15 for spring enrollees, and May 1 for summer enrollees. The criminal background check includes a residency history for all states, criminal records check for all states, and a nationwide sex offender database search.

  1. All Candler degree and nondegree students must complete a national criminal background check before they can enroll in their first semester of classes. No student will be allowed to enroll in any classes until Candler has received the results of his or her criminal background check.
  2. Students will be notified by the Office of Admissions at the time of their acceptance to Candler and prior to their application for a criminal background check that the results may be reported to the following persons:
  • the Director of Contextual Education I;
  • the Director of Contextual Education II;
  • the student’s Contextual Education I Site Supervisor;
  • the student’s Contextual Education II Site Mentor and Teaching Supervisor;
  • the student’s Ministry Internship Site Supervisor;
  • the Associate Dean of Admissions and Financial Aid;
  • the Assistant Dean of Student Life and Spiritual Formation; and
  • the student’s academic advisor. For students enrolled in Teaching Parish and Episcopal Studies Program, in addition to those named above, the student’s appointing Bishop will be notified as well as (for Teaching Parish students) the District Superintendent in which the Teaching Parish congregation is located.
  1. In the case of students with criminal history, their Contextual Education I site supervisor and Contextual Education II teaching supervisor and site mentor must approve the placement of that student at that site. If the student is not approved, the student will have the opportunity to select another site, then that site supervisor or site mentor and teaching supervisor will be notified of the criminal history and will decide whether the student will be allowed to fulfill his or her Contextual Education requirement at that site. In the case of Teaching Parish and Episcopal Studies students with a criminal record, their District Superintendent and/or Bishop must approve the appointment.
  2. If, as a result of the criminal history, no Contextual Education I or II site (or, for students in the Teaching Parish and Episcopal Studies programs, no church site) accepts the student, the student must withdraw from the MDiv program. This same mandatory withdrawal policy applies to students in the MRL program who are unable to find a contextualized placement site that will accept them because of criminal history.

Conducting criminal background checks will endeavor to take into consideration unacceptable behavior, prior efforts towards rehabilitation and on-going counseling or treatment. Detection and disclosure will serve as a means of opening conversation and opportunity for healing for potential students.

Nondisclosure of criminal activity may result in either the revocation of admission prior to matriculation or inability of the student to complete the degree program, resulting in dismissal from the program.

Cross-registration in Other Schools

ATA Cross-registration

Where appropriate, degree-seeking students may register for courses (usually without extra cost) at schools of the Atlanta Theological Association (ATA) and at nearby colleges and universities. Except for courses taken toward the ThD degree, courses taken at institutions other than Emory, including ATA institutions, are counted as transfer credit.

Students cannot take courses outside Candler during their final/graduating semester unless the host school guarantees grade submission by Candler’s due date prior to the start of the final/graduating term. Specifically required courses such as OT501, OT502, NT501, NT502, HC501, ST501, ES501, SR/CC515, MTS520, MTS600, and P501 may not be completed at other Atlanta Theological Association institutions.

  • An MDiv candidate may cross-register for a maximum of 18 semester hours in institutions other than Emory, with no more than six taken in any single semester and no more than 12 total hours from any one ATA institution.
  • An MRPL candidate may cross-register for no more than three credit hours in institutions other than Emory.
  • An MRL candidate may cross-register for a maximum of 9 semester hours in institutions other than Emory, with no more than 6 taken in any single semester and no more than 6 total being applied to the student’s area of specialization.
  • An MTS candidate may cross-register for a maximum of nine semester hours in institutions other than Emory, with no more than six taken in any single semester, when justified by the student’s area of interest and in consultation with the director of the program.
  • A ThM candidate may cross-register for no more than three credit hours in institutions other than Emory.

Schools of the Atlanta Theological Association (ATA) include Candler, Columbia Theological Seminary (Decatur, Ga.), Erskine Theological Seminary (Due West, S.C.), the Interdenominational Center (Atlanta), Lutheran Theological Southern Seminary (Columbia, S.C.), and McAfee School of Theology, Mercer University (Atlanta).

ARCHE Cross-registration

ARCHE (Atlanta Regional Council for Higher Education) cross-registration is another cross-registration option offered through Emory University. Under certain conditions, the program allows students to take a course at a member institution that may not be offered at Emory. Student must be full time and in good standing. Courses are taken on a space-available basis. See http://registrar.emory.edu/students/arche.html for more information.

Directed Study

Directed studies may not be offered on courses regularly taught and may not be used to fulfill area requirements. Prior to registering for directed study work, students must complete a request for directed study form (available from the registrar) and obtain the signatures of the instructor, faculty adviser, and associate dean of faculty and academic affairs. Directed studies may be taken on either an S/U or a letter grade basis.

MDiv, MRL, and MTS students who have completed at least two semesters of academic work with a current grade point average of at least 3.0 on a 4.0 scale may request permission to register for directed studies. No more than three credit hours may be taken in one semester, and no more than six credit hours may be applied to the MDiv degree. MRL students may take up to three hours of directed study for area of specialization credit only with permission of the academic dean. MTS students may take up to 12 hours of directed study, provided that at least six are extensions of regular offerings. In consultation with the director of general and advanced studies, ThM students may elect units of individual directed study to be used toward the completion of their degrees. MRPL students may elect to take up to 6 hours of directed study in consultation with their faculty advisers. ThD students may register for directed studies with members of the ATA faculty for a maximum of nine hours.

Students on academic probation, regardless of grade point average, are not eligible to enroll for directed studies.

Discontinuance

A student may be discontinued at any time. A student must be discontinued after three consecutive semesters on probation. Discontinuance, in contrast to dismissal, implies no irregularity of conduct or infringement of discipline. A student also may be discontinued for medical reasons. Readmission cannot be considered until three semesters have elapsed after discontinuance. When requesting readmission, the student must present satisfactory evidence that the difficulty, academic or otherwise, has been removed and that the requirements for graduation from the school of theology can now be met. ThD students should consult the program handbook for additional information regarding discontinuance.

Dismissal

Any breach in discipline, moral lapse, insubordination to authority, or action contrary to the best interests of the university or the school of theology may lead to probation, and, if serious enough, to immediate dismissal.

Emory Email

Email is the primary medium for official communication with students at Emory University. All students are assigned an Emory email address by the university and this address is used for all university and Candler communications sent via email. Students are expected to maintain their accounts and check their email regularly so that new mail will be properly received and read. Certain communications may be timecritical. Emails sent to Emory addresses from non-Emory addresses are not guaranteed to be delivered. All university and Candlerrelated emails are sent to Emory email accounts, regardless of the preferred email address indicated in OPUS.

To verify or update your email address, log-in to OPUS, go to the “Personal Information” section, and select “Email Addresses” from the drop-down menu.

Emory University Policy Statement on Equal Opportunity and Discriminatory Harassment

Emory University is an inquiry-driven, ethically engaged, and diverse community dedicated to the ideals of free academic discourse in teaching, scholarship, and community service. Emory University abides by the values of academic freedom and is built on the assumption that contention among different views is positive and necessary for the expansion of knowledge, both for the University itself and as a training ground for society at large. Emory is committed to the widest possible scope for the free circulation of ideas.

The university is committed to maintaining an environment that is free of unlawful harassment and discrimination. Pursuant to the university’s commitment to a fair and open campus environment and in accordance with federal law, Emory cannot and will not tolerate discrimination against or harassment of any individual or group based upon race, color, religion, ethnic or national origin, gender, genetic information, age, disability, sexual orientation, gender identity, gender expression, veteran’s status, or any factor that is a prohibited consideration under applicable law. Emory University welcomes and promotes an open and genuinely diverse environment.

Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Policy

Emory University is dedicated to providing equal opportunities and equal access to all individuals regardless of race, color, religion, ethnic or national origin, gender, genetic information, age, disability, sexual orientation, gender identity, gender expression, and veteran’s status. Emory University does not discriminate in admissions, educational programs, or employment on the basis of any factor stated above or prohibited under applicable law. Students, faculty, and staff are assured of participation in university programs and in the use of facilities without such discrimination. Emory University complies with Executive Order 11246, as amended, Section 503 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, the Vietnam Era Veteran’s Readjustment Assistance Act, and applicable executive orders, state and federal regulations regarding nondiscrimination, equal opportunity and affirmative action. Emory University is committed to achieving a diverse workforce through application of its affirmative action, equal opportunity and nondiscrimination policy in all aspects of employment including recruitment, hiring, promotions, transfers, discipline, terminations, wage and salary administration, benefits, and training. Inquiries regarding this policy should be directed to the Emory University Office of Equity and Inclusion, Administration Building, 201 Dowman Drive, Atlanta, GA 30322. Telephone: 404.727.9867 (v); 404.712.2049 (TDD).

Discriminatory Harassment Policy

In keeping with its commitment to maintaining an environment that is free of unlawful discrimination and with its legal obligations, Emory maintains a policy prohibiting unlawful harassment. Discriminatory harassment of any kind, whether it is sexual harassment or harassment on the basis of race, color, religion, ethnic or national origin, gender, genetic information, age, disability, sexual orientation, gender identity, gender expression, veteran’s status, or any factor that is a prohibited consideration under applicable law, by any member of the faculty, staff, administration, student body, a vendor, a contractor, guest or patron on campus, is prohibited at Emory.

Emory encourages anyone who has knowledge of discrimination on campus to report alleged violations of this policy. Because discriminatory harassment interferes with the university’s educational mission and may be unlawful, anyone who becomes aware of discrimination or discriminatory harassment committed by member of the faculty, staff, administration, student body, a vendor, a contractor, guest or patron on campus, is encouraged to report the harassment to the director of the Office of Equity and Inclusion. The director of equity and inclusion is also the university Title IX coordinator.

Emory faculty, administrators and supervisors are required to immediately report any employment complaints they receive, or incidents of discrimination or discriminatory harassment they witness, to their immediate supervisor or to Lynell A. Cadray, associate vice provost, Office of Equity and Inclusion, and university Title IX coordinator, at lynell.cadray@emory.edu or 404.727.2611 or to Candler’s associate dean of Methodist Studies, Anne Burkholder, at anne.burkholder@emory.edu or 404.727.1351.

Sexual misconduct is a form of sexual harassment that is prohibited under federal law and Emory University’s Equal Opportunity and Discriminatory Harassment Policy, Policy 1.3. Emory University’s Sexual Misconduct Policy, Policy 8.2 (http://policies.emory.edu/8.2), applies to each of Emory’s students, including those of Candler School of Theology (see page 110).

Financial Requirements for Graduation

All financial obligations to the university must be satisfied before a student can graduate. In the case of outstanding loans not yet due and payable, satisfactory loan documents must have been executed and delivered to the university and all payments must be current.

Grade Access

Grades are available in OPUS within two weeks after the end of the each semester. Official transcripts also may be ordered from the university registrar’s office online through OPUS. For additional information on ordering transcripts, refer to http://registrar.emory.edu/Students/Transcripts/index.html.

Grade Appeals

Each student has the right to appeal a grade after every attempt has been made to resolve such grievances directly among the persons involved. If those parties cannot achieve a satisfactory resolution, an appeal may be submitted in writing to the academic dean within six months of the assignment of the grade.

If the academic dean and the student cannot reach a satisfactory resolution, the student may request that the academic dean convene a committee to hear the appeal. This ad hoc committee will be comprised of the following: one area chair member of the Academic Review Board (appointed by the academic dean), the student’s faculty adviser, one student who sits on the Personnel and Academic Policy Committee (selected by the academic dean), one student at large (selected by the academic dean in consultation with the associate dean of admissions and financial aid and the student making the appeal), and the academic dean, ex officio. In all cases, students serving on this ad hoc committee must be in good standing with Candler. The area chair selected will serve as the chair of this committee and shall not be the student’s adviser.

The student making the appeal has the right to appear personally before the committee to state his or her case. The committee may also ask other persons relevant to the case under appeal to appear and/or submit appropriate documentation. A majority vote of the committee will constitute the action of the committee. It is the committee’s prerogative to sustain, raise, or lower the grade. After receiving the committee’s decision, the academic dean will notify the student.

Grading System

Grades are based on the student’s actual performance in a course judged against the criteria for grading stated in the course syllabus. The following letter grades and the accompanying descriptions are used: A – Reserved for outstanding work of exceptionally high quality that reflects a creative appropriation of course materials and practices.

B – Work that meets all of the stated course requirements and reflects a firm grasp of course materials and practices.

C – Work that shows a basic grasp of the course materials and practices.

D – Work that shows serious deficiencies but meets the minimal requirements of the course.

F – Work that fails to meet the minimal requirements of the course. No credit is given.

The letter grades A, B, and C can receive a “minus” designation to indicate work that falls just short of their stated descriptions. The letter grades B, C, and D can receive a “plus” designation to indicate work that slightly exceeds their stated descriptions.

For each semester hour of credit, each grade is worth the following quality points:

Grade Quality Points
A 4.0
A– 3.7
B+ 3.3
B 3.0
B– 2.7
C+ 2.3
C 2.0
C– 1.7
D+ 1.3
D 1.0

All courses taken to meet MDiv, MRL, MRPL, and MTS requirements must earn a letter grade of at least C (i.e. 2.0 on a scale of 4.0). The grade of IP (in progress) is assigned at the end of the first semester for courses that continue beyond one semester.

Students may enroll in courses on S/U (satisfactory/unsatisfactory) basis with prior permission of the professor in courses not being taken to satisfy requirements. MDiv students may apply up to 15 hours of electives on a S/U basis toward the degree. MRPL students may apply up to six hours of courses on a S/U basis toward the degree. MTS students may apply up to nine hours of electives on a S/U basis toward the degree. ThM students may apply up to four hours of electives (not including post-MDiv electives) on a S/U basis toward the degree.

Grading preferences of letter grade, satisfactory/unsatisfactory (S/U), or audit (AU) must be indicated at the time of course registration. Changes to grading status must be requested prior to the deadline for each semester as noted in the academic calendar. Students do not receive quality points for AU, S, U, P, or F grades.

Common Course Sequence Grade Average Requirement (MDiv Students only)

Students making a C-, D+, or D in the first semester of one of the Common Course sequences (OT501 or NT501) may enroll in the second semester of the sequence (OT502 or NT502) and will have fulfilled the sequence requirement, provided the grade in the second part of the sequence brings the average for the two-course sequence to at least a grade of C. Students with a sequence average (OT501/502 or NT501/502) of less than C will normally repeat the course or sequence; they also may satisfy sequence requirements with alternate courses upon the advice and consent of the Academic Review Board and sequence instructors.

Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory (S/U)

Instructor permission is required in order to take a class S/U. Permission must be obtained via email from the course instructor and sent to the Candler registrar for processing. MDiv students are allowed to apply up to fifteen hours of electives on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory (S/U) basis toward a degree. MRL students are allowed to apply up to three hours of area of specialization coursework on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory (S/U) basis. MRPL students are allowed to apply up to six hours of courses on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory (S/U) basis toward a degree. MTS students are allowed to apply up to nine hours of electives on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory (S/U) basis toward a degree. ThM students are allowed to take up to four hours of electives (not post-MDiv electives) on an S/U basis. Doctor of ministry courses, Contextual Education courses, TESL courses, internships, Chapel Choir, and Teaching Parish are available only on the S/U grading basis. Directed studies may be taken on an S/U basis. Courses taken to meet MDiv, MRL, and MTS requirements may not be taken for an S/U grade, nor may ThM501, ThM post-MDiv electives, or MDiv/MTS/MRPL/ThM650. Students on academic probation are not eligible to register for courses on an S/U basis. Coursework that would receive a grade of A, B, or C under the regular letter-grade system receives an S (satisfactory). Work that would regularly receive a grade of C– or below receives a U (unsatisfactory). Students who receive a U in a TESL course will be required to retake the corresponding language assessment the following fall and may be required to retake the course. After the grading change period, it is not permissible to change the grading basis of a course.

Auditing (AU)

Persons who wish to audit a course must be admitted to a degree program or to special student status. Students must have permission of the instructor to audit the course and may not be allowed to audit if the class is full or if there is a waiting list of students who wish to enroll for credit. Permission must be obtained via email from the course instructor and sent to the Candler registrar for processing. Attendance at classes is required. A grade of AU (audit) is recorded on the student’s transcript.

Students pay for audited courses at the same rate as courses taken for credit and those students already carrying a course load of 15 or more hours will not be permitted to audit a course. An officially audited course is not counted in determining full-time or part-time status by the university nor is it counted toward federal loan eligibility.

Concentration Course Policies (MDiv students only)

All concentrations have the option for directed studies, internships, and the MDiv thesis. These cannot be substituted for the capstone courses (where applicable), but can be substituted for other requirements with the approval of the concentration coordinator(s). Within each concentration, a maximum of one concentration course may be taken S/U, in accordance with Candler’s policy regarding S/U courses. Capstone courses cannot be taken S/U. All other concentration courses must receive a grade of C or above in order to fulfill concentration requirements. With permission of the instructor, capstone courses are open to nonconcentrators in all Candler degree programs as a general elective during the student’s final year.

Incomplete Work

A student may request an incomplete grade in clearly exceptional circumstances.

Eligibility As a rule, in order to qualify for an incomplete, a student must:

  • have completed at least 50% of the work for the course;
  • be able to pass the course upon satisfactory completion of remaining work to be finished during the incomplete period;
  • be able to complete the remaining work independently (apart from the administration of any missed quizzes or exams).

Procedure for Requesting an Incomplete

A master’s student in good standing and who meets the above criteria may request an incomplete grade directly from an instructor no later than the last day of classes for the semester. Incompletes requested after the last day of regular classes for a term but before the end of final exams for the semester and incompletes requested at any time by students on academic probation must be requested from the academic dean by email, copying the instructor and the Candler registrar. In such cases, the academic dean will require confirmation of eligibility based on the above bulleted criteria from the instructor of the course.

If an incomplete is approved by an instructor, the instructor, sends approval and confirmation that the above criteria have been met via email to the Candler registrar who will confirm the student’s academic standing and either send confirmation of the incomplete to the instructor and student or will refer the request to the academic dean for review.

For DMin students, incompletes must be approved by the Director of the DMin Program as well as the instructor. If approved, the Director of the DMin Program will notify the registrar who will send confirmation of the incomplete to the student and instructor.

Master’s or DMin students who request an incomplete but who do not qualify may request a course withdrawal from the Candler registrar, who may grant withdrawals until the last day of classes for the semester; such withdrawal requests made following the last day of classes for the semester (i.e. during reading period or the final exam period) should still be directed to the registrar but must be approved by the academic dean who will grant a withdrawal at this point in the semester only in extraordinary circumstances.

Submission Deadlines and General Procedures

Coursework for an approved incomplete must be completed and submitted no later than thirty days after the last day of the semester for MDiv, MRL, MRPL, MTS, ThM, DMin, and special students . ThD students have sixty days to submit incomplete coursework.

In exceptional cases in which students have ongoing hardship (e.g. continued illness or ongoing family crisis) the academic dean may approve an extended deadline which will not exceed six months following the end of the term in which the class took place (or one year for students who are on leave of absence or who are no longer enrolled at Emory University).

The student is responsible for submitting the remaining work to the instructor or arranging to sit for exams by the deadline via email and copying the email to the Candler registrar. Students who fail to submit required coursework or sit for exams by the deadline will receive a permanent incomplete failing (IF) or incomplete unsatisfactory (IU) grade for the course. The instructor is required to submit the grade change by the following midsemester advising period unless the student will graduate prior to that time, in which case the grade must be submitted by the senior grade deadline for the term in which the student will graduate. Exceptions to the due date for the grade will be made if a student receives an extended submission deadline. All incomplete work must be resolved, and a grade posted prior to certification of an Emory degree. Incomplete grades can jeopardize a student’s satisfactory academic progress and may result in academic probation, SAP review by Emory Financial Aid, and/or issues with scholarship and financial aid eligibility. Students with multiple incomplete grades for which the work has not been completed may be required to finish incomplete work prior to continuing enrollment.

Procedures and Deadlines for Incomplete Requests

Short-term or Intensive Classes

For short-term classes, which meet for only a portion of the semester, and for intensive classes, such as those offered in January and August terms or in summer school, requests for incompletes must be made directly to the instructor by the due date of the last assignment for the course as stated in the course syllabus. Any student request that comes after this deadline but within ten days of the deadline can only be approved by the academic dean and should be requested by emailing the academic dean and copying the instructor and the Candler registrar. Typically, no request can be made more than ten days following the deadline.

Dropping and Withdrawing from Courses

Courses may be dropped during the drop/add period stated in the academic calendar and on the Candler course schedule without appearing on the student’s transcript. Dropping a course after the drop/add deadline results in the course appearing on the transcript and is considered a course withdrawal. To withdraw from a course, the student must contact the Candler registrar. In such cases, a grade of W will be assigned and appear on the student’s transcript as the course grade. Students may not withdraw from a course after the last day of classes for the semester or term in which the course is offered. For short-term classes, which only meet a portion of the semester, and for intensive clases, such as those offered in January, August, and summer terms, withdrawals must be requested no later than the last scheduled class meeting for the course.

Contextual Education I: Requirements, Sequence, and Grading Policies

In Contextual Education I, typically completed in the first year, students practice ministry in a social ministry or clinical setting. MDiv students must successfully complete four credit hours of Contextual Education I requirements in addition to the related three credit hour contextualized Introductory Arts of Ministry course in the fall. The components of Contextual Education I are:

Fall or Spring Semester

  • (Contextualized) Introductory Arts of Ministry Course (3 credits)

Fall Semester

  • Contextual Education I (CE551a or 551TPa), a 90-minute weekly meeting with the site supervisor and four hours weekly site work (2 credits) or
  • Contextual Education Ia for Episcopal and Anglican Studies (CE551ANGa) (3 credits)

Spring Semester

  • Contextual Education I (CE551b, CE551ANGa, or 551TPb), a two-hour weekly integrative seminar and four hours of weekly site work (2 credits)

Total 7 or 8 credits

  1. Under normal circumstances, students must successfully complete all Contextual Education I components before enrolling in Contextual Education II.
  2. The three credit hour (Contextualized) Introductory Arts of Ministry course is a graded course taken in the fall or spring. If a student does not receive a C or above in the (Contextualized) IAM course, he/she may enroll in spring semester of Contextual Education I, but must take another IAM class to meet graduation requirements. The (Contextualized) IAM course will satisfy elective credit provided the student earned at least a grade of D.
  3. If a student withdraws from the (Contextualized) Introductory Arts of Ministry course, he/she must also withdraw from the Contextual Education site work and weekly meeting with the site supervisor (CE551a, CE551ANGa, or 551TPa). These two components of Contextual Education I must be taken simultaneously.
  4. In the fall semester, students receive a grade of “IP” (in progress) for CE551a, CE551ANGa, or CE551TPa until the spring requirements have been successfully completely. An unsatisfactory grade will be listed as a “U.” If a student receives a grade of “U” for CE551a, CE551ANGa, or 551TPa in the fall semester, he/she will not be allowed to enroll in the spring semester of contextual education.
  5. In the spring semester, students receive a grade of “S” or “U” for CE551b, CE551ANGb, or 551TPb. The grade received in spring is also the grade the student will receive for the fall course (CE551a, CE551ANGa, or 551TPa). The grade is assigned by the teaching team (site supervisor and teaching faculty). If a student receives a grade of “U” for Contextual Education I in the spring semester, the student will fail Contextual Education I and have to re-enroll in all parts of Contextual Education I.
  6. If a student withdraws from Contextual Education I in the spring (CE551b, CE551ANGb, or 551TPb), she or he also is withdrawn from Contextual Education I in the fall (CE551a, CE551ANGa, or 551TPa). A grade of “W” (withdrawal) is recorded for both semesters by the teaching team. Contextual Education I requirements must be repeated the next year.

Contextual Education II Procedures

In Contextual Education II, typically taken in the second year, students practice ministry in ecclesial settings, which include congregations, campus ministries, and special ministry settings. MDiv students must successfully complete six credit hours of Contextual Education II. The components of Contextual Education II are:

Fall or Spring Semester

  • Contextual Education Elective (CEE) (3 credits)
  • Introductory Arts of Ministry Course (3 credits)

Fall Semester

*Contextual Education II (CE552a, CE552TPa, or CE552ANGa), eight hours of weekly site work at an ecclesial setting, 1.5 hours of biweekly mentoring, and a biweekly geographically rotating reflection group facilitated by an experienced practitioner (3 credits) (2 credits CE552ANGa)

Spring Semester

  • Contextual Education II (CE552b, 552TPb, or 552ANGb), eight hours of weekly site work at an ecclesial setting, 1.5 hours of biweekly mentoring, and a biweekly geographically rotating reflection group facilitated by an experienced practitioner (3 credits)(2 credits CE552ANGb)

Total 12 credits

  1. Students are able to choose a site for their Contextual Education II placement in which they work eight hours per week. The site, however, must be able to fulfill the five areas of ministry: administration, liturgy (worship and preaching), pastoral care, mission and outreach, and religious education. No more than three students may serve at one site. A student’s site selection is subject to the Contextual Education II director’s approval.
  2. All students are supervised by a site mentor, an ordained pastor employed full-time in the setting and a graduate of an accredited seminary and receive 1.5 hours of biweekly mentoring from their site mentor. Students who are employed in churches may use their site as their second-year placement as long as their placement fulfills the placement requirements for Contextual Education II.
  3. Along with the site work, students are assigned to a reflection group facilitated by an experienced practitioner in ordained pastoral ministry. Groups meet biweekly in the local ecclesial settings where students are serving. Groups are organized by geographic location and meet on Mondays throughout the academic year.
  4. In addition to the site work and reflection group, students are required to enroll in one three hour IntroductoryArts of Ministry course and one Contextual Education elective (CEE). These courses may be taken in either the fall or spring semester and may be taken independently of each other.
  5. All site work and reflection group assignments must be completed no later than one week following the last day of classes. Failure to receive a passing grade from the site mentor and the reflection group teaching supervisor will require a student to re-enroll in Contextual Education II the following year. Only upon successful completion of the site work and the reflection group during the fall and spring semesters will a student receive the six (6) hours credit for Contextual Education II. (Note: students receive an “In Progress” grade for the fall semester. Only when both semesters have been satisfactorily completed will a satisfactory (S) grade be awarded for each semester).

Graduate Division of Religion Seminars

Students whose aptitude in a given field of study qualifies them for advanced work may register for graduate seminars in the Graduate Division of Religion with the approval of the instructor. Permission must be obtained via email from the instructor and forwarded to candlerregistrar@emory.edu for processing.

Sexual Assault Prevention for Graduate Students (SAP-G)

Emory University is actively working toward a campus in which no student fears or experiences violence. SAP-G, an interactive online education platform, is one part of Emory’s comprehensive interpersonal violence prevention program. All incoming students are required to complete SAP-G training. Through it you will learn about preventing and responding to sexual assault, harassment, domestic violence and stalking in the Emory community. SAP-G is a short training program, designed to help students prevent and respond to sexual assault, harassment, domestic violence, and stalking in the Emory community. It is offered in two parts. Part I takes approximately an hour to complete and part II (a follow-up survey sent six weeks after part I is completed) takes approximately 15 minutes to complete. All video portions of SAP-G have a closed captioning (CC) option and all video and audio portions can be replayed. Part I of the SAP-G training must be completed by August 15 for fall enrollees, December 15 for spring enrollees, or May 1 for summer enrollees to enroll in classes in the fall semester. Part II of the SAP-G training must be completed by October 15 for fall enrollees, March 15 for spring enrollees, or July 15 for summer enrollees wishing to register for future semesters.

Immunization Requirement

All incoming Emory students must meet the CDC and American College Health Association immunization guidelines prior to registration for classes. (Please note that if you have begun a multidose immunization series prior to registration such as Hepatitis B, it can be completed at the Emory University Student Health Service [EUSHS] Immunization Clinic; vaccinations given at EUSHS are on a fee-for-service basis and are not covered by tuition.) Emory students must have the following required immunizations prior to matriculation: (1) measles, mumps, and rubella requirement; (2) tetanus-diptheria requirement; (3) hepatitis B requirement; (4) varicella (chicken pox) requirement; and (5) tuberculosis screening requirement. For additional information about these requirements and to access the Entrance Health History and Consent for Treatment forms, visit http://studenthealth.emory.edu.

Inclement Weather Policy

In the event of life-threatening weather conditions, the university provost may deem it necessary to close the university officially or delay the opening time. Any schedule changes or delays will be announced via the inclement weather phone system, 404.727.1234. The information on the phone system is the official announcement. An update will also be posted on the Emory website (http://emory.edu) as soon as possible after any decision on schedule changes or closings is made.

Information Technology Policies and Guidelines

http://policies.emory.edu/5.1

The following summary presents a broad overview of policies and guidelines for use of electronic systems at Emory. If you are a system administrator or have access to university data outside your personal account, additional policies apply. In addition, you are responsible for complying with any additional policies in your school.

Information Technology Use Policy

This policy applies to Emory faculty, staff, students, and retirees who have been issued computer accounts such as an Emory NetID and to visitors and guests who have been issued sponsored computer accounts. This policy applies to all Emory information technology resources, whether they are accessed from campus or from a remote location. This policy also applies to anyone who has been granted access to or connects any device to the Emory network or Emory IT resources.

General Principles

Emory’s information technology (IT) resources are provided for uses consistent with the university’s missions of teaching, learning, research, and service or for related administrative support.

  • The use of Emory’s IT resources must be consistent with other university policies, government regulations, and laws.
  • IT resources are not to be used for private financial gain, for supporting non-Emory related businesses, or for supporting political candidates or campaigns.
  • Users of Emory IT resources are expected to read and abide by all relevant IT policies and standards and to complete any prescribed IT security training.

Information Security Requirements

Users of Emory’s IT resources may not:

  • Share their passwords or other access credentials;
  • Attempt to hack, bypass, or violate security controls or conduct unauthorized testing of IT resources for security vulnerabilities;
  • Access, modify, or share sensitive data or information obtained from any of Emory’s systems without appropriate authorization;
  • Use access credentials issued to other individuals or attempt to impersonate another individual in order to access IT resources. Users of Emory IT resources must:
  • Implement reasonable and appropriate safeguards to protect sensitive or critical information that they create or maintain;
  • Dispose of sensitive information in a secure manner (e.g. shredding, physical destruction, disk wiping)
  • Report any IT security incidents or security policy violations;
  • Cooperate with authorized IT security investigations;
  • Cooperate with authorized requests to discontinue activities that threaten the confidentiality, integrity, or availability of IT resources.
  • Return all institutional data and IT resources to Emory upon termination of employment and securely delete all institutional data from personally owned devices/media.

For full policy details (including conduct, personal usage, network protection, and sanctions), see http://policies.emory.edu/5.1.

Interrupted Program

A student must resume the program of study within three years of the last term in which work was done in residence. After this three-year period, a new admissions application is required, including a new application form, updated letters of recommendation, and a letter describing plans and a schedule for completing the program of study. If the withdrawal was for health reasons, the student must obtain permission from a university physician before registering and resuming the program of study. In readmission of former students to Candler, only coursework done within five years that has earned a letter grade of C or better or an S grade will be considered for degree credit.

Involuntary Withdrawal

Emory University considers the safety and welfare of its students, faculty and staff a top priority. When a student engages in behavior that violates Emory’s rules of conduct, the behavior will be addressed as a disciplinary matter under the applicable Student Conduct Code. The Student Conduct Code defines prohibited conduct and outlines a process for conducting disciplinary proceedings. All allegations of sexual misconduct will be addressed through the university’s Sexual Misconduct Policy, Policy 8.2, and will be adjudicated by Emory’s Title IX Coordinator for Students, Judith Pannell, 404.727.4079, judith.pannell@emory.edu (see page 111).

The Involuntary Withdrawal Policy and Procedure, by contrast, is not a disciplinary code, policy or process. It is not intended to apply to situations in which a student engages in behavior that violates the university’s rules of conduct. It is intended to apply when a student’s observed conduct, actions and/or statements indicate a direct threat to the student’s own health and/or safety, or a direct threat to the health and/or safety of others. There may be situations in which both this Involuntary Withdrawal Policy and the Student Conduct Code apply.

Criteria

A student may be withdrawn involuntarily from Emory if the university Threat Assessment Team determines that the student represents a direct threat to the health and safety of himself/herself or others by (1) engaging or threatening to engage in behavior which poses a high probability of substantial harm to himself/herself or others; or (2) engaging or threatening to engage in behavior which would cause significant property damage, would directly and substantially impede the lawful activities of others, or would interfere with the educational process and the orderly operation of the university.

Procedure

When Associate Dean Anne Burkholder, or her designee, based on a student’s conduct, actions or statements, has reasonable cause to believe that the student meets one or more of the criteria for involuntary withdrawal, he or she will consult with appropriate Emory University officials and may initiate an assessment of the student’s ability to safely participate in the university’s program. As a result of this process, a determination may be made that withdrawal is appropriate.

If the student agrees to withdraw voluntarily from the university and waives any right to any further procedures available under this policy, the student will be given a grade of W for all courses, will be advised in writing of any conditions necessary prior to reenrollment, and will be referred for appropriate mental health services. If the student refuses to withdraw voluntarily from the university, and the associate dean continues to have reasonable cause to believe the student meets one or more of the criteria for involuntary withdrawal, the associate dean may require the student to be evaluated by an appropriate mental health professional.

Evaluation

The associate dean may refer the student for a mandatory evaluation by an appropriate mental health professional. The mental health professional may be selected by the university, so long as there is no cost to the student for the evaluation. A written copy of the involuntary referral shall be provided to the student.

The evaluation must be completed within five school days after the date the referral letter is provided to the student. Prior to the evaluation, the student will be required to sign a written authorization authorizing the exchange of relevant information among the mental health professional(s) and the university. Upon completion of the evaluation, copies of the evaluation report will be provided to the associate dean and the student.

The mental health professional making the evaluation shall make an individualized and objective assessment of the student’s ability to safely participate in Emory’s program, based on a reasonable professional judgment relying on the most current medical knowledge and/or the best available objective evidence. This assessment shall include a determination of the nature, duration and severity of the risk posed by the student to the health or safety of himself/herself or others, the probability that the potentially threatening injury will actually occur, and whether reasonable modifications of policies, practices or procedures will sufficiently mitigate the risk. The mental health professional will, with appropriate authorization, share his/her recommendation with the associate dean, who will take this recommendation into consideration in determining whether the student should be involuntarily withdrawn from Emory. A copy of the mental health professional’s recommendation will be provided to the student, unless, in the opinion of the mental health professional, it would be damaging to the student to do so.

If the evaluation results in a determination by the mental health professional that the student’s continued attendance presents no significant risk to the health or safety of the student or others, and no significant threat to property, to the lawful activities of others, or to the educational processes and orderly operations of the university, no further action shall be taken to withdraw the student from the university.

If the evaluation results in a determination that the continued attendance of the student presents a significant risk to the health or safety of the student or others, such that there is a high probability of substantial harm, or a significant threat to property, to the lawful activities of others, or to the educational processes and orderly operations of the university, the student may be involuntarily withdrawn from the university. In such an event, the student shall be informed in writing by the associate dean of the involuntary withdrawal, of his/her right to an informal hearing, of his/her right to appeal the decision of the hearing officer, and of any conditions necessary for reenrollment. In most cases, a student who is involuntarily withdrawn will be given a grade of W in all courses in which the student is currently enrolled.

Informal Hearing

A student who has been involuntarily withdrawn may request an informal hearing before a hearing officer appointed by the associate dean by submitting a written request to be heard within two business days from receipt of the notice of involuntary withdrawal. A hearing will be set as soon as possible. The student shall remain involuntarily suspended pending completion of the hearing.

The hearing shall be informal and nonadversarial. During the hearing, the student may present relevant information and may be advised by an Emory faculty or staff member or a licensed health professional of his/her choice. The role of the adviser is limited to providing advice to the student.

At the conclusion of the hearing, the hearing officer shall decide whether to uphold the involuntary withdrawal or whether to reconsider, and the student shall be provided written notice of the hearing officer’s decision as soon as possible.

Appeal to the Dean

The student may appeal the hearing officer’s decision to the dean, who shall review all information presented and make a final decision as to whether or not to uphold the involuntary withdrawal.

Emergency Suspension

The university may take emergency action to suspend a student pending a final decision on whether the student will be involuntarily withdrawn, in situations in which (a) there is imminent danger of serious physical harm to the student or others, (b) there is imminent danger of significant property damage, (c) the student is unable or unwilling to meet with the associate dean, (d) the student refuses to complete the mandatory evaluation, or (e) the associate dean determines such other exceptional circumstances exist that suspension is warranted. In the event emergency action is taken to suspend the student on an interim basis, the student shall be given notice of the emergency suspension and an initial opportunity to address the circumstances on which the emergency suspension is based.

Conditions for Reenrollment

Because this Involuntary Withdrawal Policy applies to cases in which there is a concern about the safety of the student or others, the associate dean of admissions and financial aid may require a student who has been involuntarily withdrawn under this policy to be reevaluated before they are readmitted in order to assure that they present no direct threat to themselves or others.

January and August Courses

A limited number of courses are available in an intensive format in early January and early August. The class meetings for these courses generally end before the regular term begins, though some coursework may be due later in the regular semester. Students may only enroll in one intensive course per term, which is considered part of spring term for January courses and part of fall term for August courses for registration, financial aid, and billing purposes. Students enrolling in January and August courses who are also enrolled in a CE (Contextual Education) course may take a maximum of 18 credit hours during the spring or fall term, respectively, including the January/August course. Grades for January and August courses are not available until the end of the regular term.

Leave of Absence

A student in good standing may be granted up to two one-year leaves of absence upon review and approval of the associate dean of admissions and financial aid and registrar. The student should be aware that the university will not certify to loan officers or government agencies that a student on leave of absence is in residence or actively pursuing a course of study.

For the purpose of determining eligibility for a leave of absence, a degree student must be in good standing and have resolved all incomplete work. Leaves of absence are not to be used to resolve academic difficulties. Time spent in a leave of absence does not count toward the six-year limit for MDiv, MRL, and MTS students, the five-year limit for MRPL students, or the two-year limit for ThM students. Students beyond these limits are not eligible for leave but may apply for an extension of the time allowed to complete degree requirements in accord with the rules governing such extensions (see “Completion of Studies”).

MDiv, MRL, MRPL, MTS and ThM students who withdraw or take a leave of absence from Candler must complete an exit interview with the Candler registrar. If the student begins a leave of absence during the semester and does not request a leave and complete an exit interview, an F will be recorded for all their current courses, and the student will be responsible for all charges.

Any request for a leave of absence from the DMin program must be approved by the director of the program and the academic dean and are for one year only. The Candler registrar must also be notified of the leave request.

ThD students must notify both the Candler registrar and the director of the ATA ThD program. Requests from ThD students must be received by April 1 for the fall semester or November 1 for the spring semester.

If the student begins a leave of absence within the first five weeks of a semester, then he/she is subject to an adjustment in tuition, fees, and if applicable, Candler scholarship. Adjustments will be made according to the Emory University refund schedule established by the Office of Student Financial Services in 100 Boisfeuillet Jones Center, 404.727.6095, studentfinancials.emory.edu. A refund will be issued for any credit remaining after appropriate adjustments. Refunds for students who are federal (Title IV) financial aid recipients will be prorated in accordance with the Higher Education Amendments of 1992 and any related regulations. University policy stipulates that if a student drops any or all of his or her work after the last day indicated in the academic calendar, tuition, fees, scholarship, and loans are not adjusted and no refund is granted.

A student returning to Candler after a leave of absence should request a return from a leave of absence at least 90 days prior to the beginning of the term in which he or she wishes to return. The request to return from a leave of absence must be made in writing to candlerregistrar@emory.edu.

Readmission is required of degree students who have been discontinued or who have an expired leave of absence. Requests for readmission ordinarily are not accepted after a period of three academic years. Students who have not been enrolled after a period of three academic years are required to complete the entire application process including submitting letters of recommendation, completing required written statements, securing official transcripts, and all other items required for admission to the degree program.

Modern Language Study

Students in the master of divinity program may, with permission of the academic dean or registrar, receive credit for no more than six hours of modern language study in Emory College as electives toward the degree (without having to contract them up to graduate level). Master of theological studies students may count up to three credit hours per semester-long language course taken for three or more hours of credit at the undergraduate or master’s level toward the MTS degree as area of focus or elective hours (in the case of undergraduate courses, without having to contract them up to graduate level). There is no general language requirement for any of Candler’s degree programs.

Non-Native English Speakers Exam Policy

Non-native English speakers are permitted to bring a paper dictionary to exams. Additionally, the School of Theology permits an instructor to grant at his or her discretion extra time for an examination to eligible students whose native language is other than English. Typically, this would involve an extra half hour for any in-class assessment, in-class midterm, or in-person final exam. Deadlines for papers and take-home exams remain unaffected. Non-native speakers wishing to take advantage of this policy should complete a form available from the Candler registrar’s office, which in turn must be approved by the registrar and academic dean. The registrar will maintain the list of eligible students each semester that will be provided to faculty upon request. Only those students on the list may be granted extra time.

The general standards for granting extra time are that theology candidates will not be eligible if:

  1. The student has lived in a country for at least three years in which the primary means of communication is English or in a multilingual country in which English was the primary means of communication of the student; or
  2. The primary language of instruction was English for at least three years of the student’s college or professional education; or
  3. The student has represented him/herself as being fully fluent in English.

Official Transcripts

Official transcripts are available to order from the university registrar’s office. For additional information on ordering transcripts, refer to http://registrar.emory.edu/Students/Transcripts/index.html. The Candler registrar’s office does not process transcript requests.

OPUS (Online Pathway to University Students)

http://opus.emory.edu/

OPUS, or Online Pathway to University Students, is Emory’s web-based student information system. Students gain OPUS access through the admissions process and it continues to be the primary source of student information throughout enrollment. Through OPUS, all students have access to class schedules, grades, address changes, and student financial information. Registration and class schedule changes are available for Candler students through OPUS.

Orientation

All students registering for the first time in Candler School of Theology, including dual degree, exchange, transfer, and parttime students, and students beginning their first semester at Candler, are required to attend the orientation session scheduled before each semester. As appropriate, this orientation includes introductions to the ConEd, Episcopal Studies, and Teaching Parish programs. International students also are required to attend a Candler International Orientation, which includes ESOL assessment and the Emory University ISSS International Graduate Orientation, all of which precede the general orientation at Candler.

At Orientation, students are introduced to Candler as a context for theological learning and spiritual and vocational formation, and are welcomed into the community by faculty, staff, and returning students. Matriculating students will receive detailed information by email or via the Candler website.

Pitts Theology Library Borrowing Policies

General Policies

Periodicals, microforms, and materials located in Reference and Special Collections do not circulate and must be used in the library. Reserves materials may be checked out for a three-hour period from the circulation desk, unless the teaching faculty member requests a different loan period. Reserves also may be checked out overnight one hour before closing; they are due no later than one hour after the library opens the next day. Many reserve readings are available electronically for current students.

Materials located in the bookstacks and in the media collection can be checked out. Materials in the media collection can be checked out for one week. The library also lends a few laptops, tablets, and technology peripherals to theology students. Items that can be taken out of the library circulate for six days; items for in-building use circulate for three hours. No renewals are permitted for laptops and peripherals. Loan periods for books are based on a patron’s classification in discoverE (Emory’s online library catalog):

  • Emory faculty members: 365 days

  • Emory staff and graduate students: 120 days

  • All other registered patrons: 28 days
    This category includes Emory undergraduates, alumni, and members of affiliate organizations.

If you are a registered patron, you can recall an item that is checked out by someone else using a request link in discoverE. The person who has the item will receive an automated notice from the library, indicating that it must be returned within 10 days. You will be notified when the item is ready for pickup.

You should review your library account online and check your email regularly in order to keep up with due dates and recall notices. You can renew your library materials online or by telephone (404.727.4166). Overdue or recalled items cannot be renewed. All Pitts books can be returned at any Emory library.

Fines

Patrons are responsible for returning or renewing items on or before the date they are due. Notices are generally sent as a courtesy, but if fines accrue, they are expected to be paid whether or not one receives a notice. Borrowed books may be returned either at the circulation desk inside the library or at the book drop located outside of the second floor building entrace to Candler School of Theology and Pitts Theology Library (on the side closest to White Hall and Emerson Hall). If you will be out of town when your books are due, be sure to renew them or return them before you leave. If you will be out of town for more than 10 days, it is a good idea to return your books beforehand; if an item you have checked out is recalled by another patron, you will have only 10 days to return it and avoid a fine. The following schedule of fines is applied to enforce these policies:

  • $2 per day per item for recall overdues
  • $.50 per day per item for regular overdues
  • $1 per hour per item for reserve materials and room keycards
  • $5 per hour per item for laptops and technology peripherals

Patrons are also responsible for any materials they borrow that are lost or stolen. Damaged books are assessed fines based on their condition. The minimum replacement charge for a lost or stolen books is $100; more may be charged, based on the cost of replacement. Lost and damaged fees are nonrefundable. Patrons who accumulate large unpaid fines or otherwise abuse library policies will lose borrowing privileges. Technology items have higher lost and replacement costs. Please visit http://pitts.emory.edu/borrow for all fine policies.

Security and Bag Checks

Many library materials are protected against theft by an electronic security system. If an alarm sounds as you leave the building, please return to the circulation desk so that the problem can be identified. Because security strips cannot be attached to some library materials, the library reserves the right to inspect your backpack, book bag, or briefcase as you leave the library.

Readmission

A student who is not enrolled in consecutive fall/spring or spring/fall semesters must request readmission before registering for a subsequent term. The request for readmission form and supporting statement must be received and approved by July 1 for enrollment in the fall semester, December 1 for the spring semester, and May 1 for the summer term. Written notification of a readmission decision for MDiv, MRL, MRPL, MTS, ThM and special students typically is sent within three weeks of the request becoming complete.

For ThD students, the written request for readmission must be received by April 1 for the fall semester and November 1 for the spring semester. ThD readmission may be granted by the Office of Admissions and Financial Aid with the recommendation of both the ATA ThD Committee and the primary adviser.

Students with unpaid balances or incomplete coursework will not be considered for readmission. Readmission after withdrawal for medical reasons requires medical clearance by appropriate university health officials. Students requesting readmission should inquire about financial aid as far in advance as possible, preferably during the preceding semester.

Registration

Each semester, students consult with their advisers and register for courses during the preregistration period listed on the academic calendar. First-year students register for courses in the months before enrollment in consultation with the staff of the registrar’s office. Returning MDiv, MRL, MRPL, and MTS students who do not have an advising conversation prior to preregistration will have a hold placed on their OPUS account and will be prevented from registering until advising is completed and the faculty adviser notifies the Candler registrar’s office. Failure to register by the proper date results in a $150 penalty.

Continuous registration is required for the fall and spring semesters throughout the degree program, either for academic credit or through payment of the noncredit administrative fee. For doctoral students, failure to maintain continuous registration will result in termination from the doctoral program.

Students may cancel their full registration with a full refund through the end of the Drop/Add period. After the Drop/Add period, students who withdraw voluntarily receive a prorated refund according to the schedule published in the university’s Schedule of Classes each semester. With both voluntary withdrawal or dismissal, the student must fulfill all financial obligations incurred by enrollment in the school of theology.

Release of Student Information

The university registrar is the official custodian of academic records and therefore is the only official who may issue an official transcript of an academic record. Under no circumstances will Candler issue a copy of a student’s transcript. Under no circumstances will copies of any transcript from any institution in a student file be made for any reason.

General Guidelines

The general rule is that no information, applications, forms, letters, records, transcripts, etc. may be released, whether in writing or orally, without prior written consent, dated and signed by the student, specifying the records to be released, the reasons for such release and to whom the records are to be released.

Information, defined by the university as “directory information”, may be released without prior written consent from the student provided the student has not filed a “release no information” request with the university. Directory information for a given student includes:

  • name
  • whether or not the student is currently enrolled
  • the school or division in which the student is or was enrolled and his or her class/year
  • dates of enrollment including full-time or part-time status
  • degree or degrees earned (if any), date of degree, major area of concentration and academic honors received
  • awards of merit and participation in officially recognized activities and sports;
  • addresses and telephone numbers
  • electronic mail address.

Any information released must be done in compliance with the university’s Policy on the Confidentiality and Release of Information about Students.

The Candler registrar’s office will attempt to handle questions or procedures concerning this policy as need arises. Contact candlerregistrar@emory.edu for additional information.

Disclosure in Response to Telephone Inquiries:

Only those items determined by the university to be “directory information” may be released in response to telephone inquiries. Such items include:

  • name
  • whether or not the student is currently enrolled
  • division or school in which the student is or was enrolled and her or his class year
  • dates of enrollment
  • degree or degrees earned (from Candler, if any), date of degree, and academic honors received
  • awards of merit and participation in officially recognized activities and sports
  • local address and telephone
  • home address

Disclosure of Records to the Students

The student has the right, on request to the proper official (i.e., dean, academic dean or registrar), to know of the existence and content of all materials that are in his/her official records as kept by the university and/or school of the university.

A student is entitled to an official transcript of his/her academic record. Transcripts are issued only through the university registrar’s office and are ordered via OPUS or the online Transcript Order Service. Normal processing time is two working days. For additional information, refer to http://registrar.emory.edu/students/transcripts/index.html or contact 404.727.6042.

A student has the right to inspect and review his/her permanent academic record and all official records, files and data directly related to him/her including all material that is incorporated into each student’s cumulative record folder and intended for school use or to be available to parties outside the school or university. The student is entitled to an explanation of any information recorded in these files. When the original is shown, examination should be permitted only under conditions which will prevent its alteration or mutilation (these documents will only be shown in the presence of a proper official—i.e., dean, academic dean or registrar).

The request for the specific record to be examined or reviewed by the student shall be in writing and the university shall comply with this request within a reasonable period of time, but in no case more than 45 days after the request has been made. The right to inspect and review educational records includes the right to obtain copies of the records when failure to provide copies would effectively prevent a student from exercising the right to inspect and review the educational records.

When copies are provided a fee to cover cost is charged. A schedule of such fees is available from the office charged with keeping the record in question. Documents submitted by or for the student in support of her/his application for admission or for transfer credit will not be returned to the student, nor sent elsewhere at her/his request. For example, a transcript from another college or from a high school will not be sent to a third institution. (This includes a different division of Emory.)

Disclosure of Records to Faculty an Administrative Staff

Faculty and administrative staff members who have a legitimate interest in the material and demonstrate a need to know for purposes reasonably related to the performance of their duties will be permitted to look over the records of any student. The contents of the full student record should never leave or be viewed outside the Office of the Registrar.

Faculty and administrative staff members who have a legitimate interest in the information and demonstrate a need to know for purposes reasonably related to the performance of their duties may also request student data that goes beyond directory information. The data must be used solely for the purpose described in the request and must never be released to any third party not specifically listed in the request. If such student data is needed for another purpose, the requestor must contact the registrar for authorization. It is the responsibility of faculty and staff who request such information to ensure that any systems/machines on which these student data are stored are secured according to Emory University guidelines. Failure to adhere to such agreements may lead to loss of student data privileges or employee disciplinary action.

The faculty adviser for each student will be provided an electronic copy of the student’s autobiographical statement and résumé by the registrar at the beginning of the student’s program of study. The advisers and directors of the MTS and ThM programs also will be provided with the student’s proposed plan of study from the application for admission.

Records Maintenance

Student records are maintained as in-house, working documents in the administrative offices of Candler School of Theology as noted:

  1. Official transcripts for Candler students are maintained by the university registrar. Transcripts provide information on student enrollment and academic performance.
  2. Admissions records of students who enroll are maintained through the admissions process by the Candler Admissions Office. Following enrollment, letters of recommendation and admissions notes are destroyed for those who have enrolled in degree programs. (Letters of recommendation and admissions notes are retained for those enrolling as special, nondegree students, in the event they seek admission to a degree program.)

    The remaining materials are forwarded to the Candler registrar who maintains the record through the period of enrollment. The record may contain official transcripts of work completed before admission to Candler, autobiographical statements, transfer credit memoranda, TOEFL scores, and official correspondence from, to and about students before and during their enrollment at Candler. These files are destroyed five years after graduation or last date of enrollment.

    Admissions records of students who do not enroll may be destroyed three years following the date of the original application period.
  3. In addition to the files maintained by the university Office of Financial Aid, aid records for currently enrolled students are maintained in the Candler Office of Financial Aid. These records include statements of financial need, copies of scholarship award letters, documentation of support received from external sources, emergency loan authorizations, and related correspondence. Financial aid records become part of the enrollment record upon graduation and are retained for five years after graduation or last date of enrollment. Financial aid records for those who withdraw from Candler are retained for five years after the date of last enrollment and are then placed in the enrollment record if not activated by readmission. For more information on Emory University’s policy on the release of student information, please visit the Emory University Registrar’s website at http://registrar.emory.edu/students/ferpa.html.

Remedial Courses

A student with deficiencies in his or her undergraduate education may be required to take additional work in Emory College. When such work is required, the student’s academic load in the school of theology is reduced proportionately. Full tuition is assessed, and no academic credit toward a graduate degree is awarded for such work.

Retaking Courses

Some courses are acceptable for repeat and are designated as such by the letter R following the course number or by the course number 698. Most courses are not acceptable for repeat. Specifically, students who earn lower than a C in a class intended to meet an area requirement may retake the course. However, the same course cannot be counted more than once towards the total credit hours for graduation.

Semester System

The school of theology operates on the semester system. The academic year is composed of fall and spring semesters, as well as a summer term. Courses are offered for one to four semester hours of credit.

Sexual Misconduct

http://policies.emory.edu/8.2

Title IX of the Educational Amendments of 1972 protects people from sex discrimination in educational programs and activities at institutions that receive federal financial assistance. Sexual misconduct is a form of sexual harassment that is prohibited under federal law and under Emory University Equal Opportunity and Discriminatory Harassment Policy, Policy 1.3. Sexual misconduct can occur in many forms, including, but not limited to, sexual harassment, domestic violence, intimate partner violence, sexual assault, and stalking. Emory fosters a safe learning and working environment that supports academic and professional growth of students, staff, and faculty and the university does not tolerate sexual misconduct in its community and will take prompt action when misconduct occurs. The university will take seriously every allegation or report of sexual misconduct. Emory University’s response is intended to ensure that all parties involved receive appropriate support and fair treatment and that allegations of sexual misconduct are handled in a prompt, thorough, and equitable manner.

Emory University’s Sexual Misconduct Policy, Policy 8.2 (http://policies.emory.edu/8.2), applies to each of Emory’s schools, including the students of Candler School of Theology. Policy 8.2 sets forth a centralized reporting, investigation and grievance/conduct process for allegations of sexual misconduct pursuant to Title IX. Policy 8.2, which is administered through the Office of Emory’s Title IX Coordinator for Students applies to all sexual misconduct allegation(s) against a student. While students are bound to provisions of Candler’s conduct and honor codes, Policy 8.2 will take precedence in any investigation and adjudication of sexual misconduct. If there are multiple violations implicated by a reported incident (e.g., a violation of Policy 8.2 in addition to a violation of Candler policy), the student may be subject to multiple conduct proceedings, depending on the particular facts involved, or consent to a single proceeding under Policy 8.2, with all charges adjudicated in one forum. If a student is ultimately found not to have violated Policy 8.2, the student may still be subject to separate disciplinary proceedings under Candler’s policy. For additional information, contact Anne Burkholder, associate dean of Methodist Studies, 404.727.1351, anne.burkholder@emory.edu.

Stewards of Children

Students in the MDiv and MRL programs as well as other students who enroll in internships must complete the Stewards of Children–Adults Protecting Children from Sexual Abuse training, either online or in person, at the expense of the school. Students will not be allowed to register for contextual education or internships until notification of training is received.

Student Health Insurance

All new and continuing degree-seeking students and all international and exchange students are required to have health insurance. For more details about the Emory University Student Health Insurance Plan, visit http://aetnastudenthealth.com, choose “Find Your School” and enter Emory University, or contact the Emory University Student Health Insurance Office at 404.727.7560 or mandatoryinsurance@listserv.cc.emory.edu.

Student Honor and Conduct Code

Candler School of Theology is a professional school of Emory University that seeks to educate men and women for professional competence in ministry and the theological disciplines. In keeping with its mission, Candler expects all members of its community to maintain academic integrity in their course of study and to conduct themselves in a manner appropriate to the professional character of the ministry and consistent with the standards of Emory University.

Student Academic Honor

Candler School of Theology requires that all material submitted by a student in fulfilling his or her academic requirements be the original work of the student. Violations of academic honor include any action by a student indicating dishonesty or a lack of integrity in academic ethics. Violations in this category include but are not limited to cheating or plagiarism.

Cheating includes seeking, acquiring, receiving, or passing information about the content of an examination prior to its authorized release or during its administration. Cheating also includes seeking, using, giving, or obtaining unauthorized assistance in any academic assignment or examination.

Plagiarism is the act of presenting as one’s own work the work of another person, whether published or unpublished (including the work of another student). A writer’s work should be regarded as his or her own property. Any person who uses a writer’s distinctive work without proper acknowledgment, whether in the form of direct quotation or paraphrase, is guilty of plagiarism. In addition, papers, or portions of papers, submitted for academic credit in one course cannot be submitted for credit in another course without the express permission of the instructors of both courses.

While plagiarism is not limited to instances of unattributed direct quotation, any quotation from another writer, whether drawn from a print or an electronic source, must be both clearly marked (either by being placed in quotation marks or clearly indented from the paper’s margin) and accompanied by a clear citation of the source from which it is drawn. This citation should include the author, title, place and date of publication (where relevant), and page number(s) (for print media) or location number(s) or URL (for electronic media). All citations should be recorded in a footnote or endnote (n.b., for the purposes of this policy the Harvard system of referencing is considered a form of endnote). Although all the sources that have been consulted in preparing an assignment should normally be listed in a bibliography at the end of the assignment, the mere listing of a source in a bibliography does not by itself constitute proper citation of material quoted from that source; rather, the student must also include a footnote or endnote accompanying the quoted material.

Any questions about whether material in a paper needs to be identified through a citation, as well as any question about the proper form to be used for a citation, should be directed to the course instructor. When unsure whether or not to acknowledge a source, it is always advisable to provide a citation. Failure to acknowledge source material through proper citation constitutes plagiarism.

Procedures for Adjudicating Student Academic Honor Violations

Instructors are required to report in writing all instances involving an alleged violation of academic honor (including plagiarism) to the academic dean and the registrar, who will conduct a preliminary investigation of the alleged violation. The academic dean will decide if there is prima facie evidence of an honor code violation, and whether the case should be resolved using the informal process. In the case of students in the ThD in Pastoral Counseling program, alleged violations of the Honor Code will be reported to the interseminary ThD Committee. The Committee will inform the academic dean and the director of academic administration and registrar of the allegation, conduct an initial review, and report its findings and recommendations to the academic dean, who may then initiate Candler’s formal or informal process.

Informal Process

The academic dean, registrar, faculty involved, and whomever else the academic dean deems appropriate will review the facts of the case. In cases where the academic dean determines that a student has committed plagiarism, she or he will normally attempt to resolve the case informally by taking one or more of the following actions:

  1. Award a grade of “F” for the course
  2. Suspend the student for the rest of the semester or longer
  3. Discontinue the student from school If the student agrees to the action, the process ends here. The student is notified of the academic dean’s decision in writing. Failure to achieve agreement with the student warrants the formal process as outlined below.

Formal Process

The case will be heard by an ad hoc committee comprised of the following: one area chair member of the Academic Review Board (appointed by the academic dean), the student’s faculty adviser, one student who sits on the Personnel and Academic Policy Committee (selected by the academic dean), one student at-large (selected by the academic dean in consultation with the student whose case is being heard and the assistant dean of student life and spiritual formation), the academic dean, and the registrar. The registrar will be a nonvoting member of the committee. In all cases, students serving on this ad hoc committee must be in good standing with Candler. The area chair selected will serve as the chair of this committee and shall not be the student’s adviser. In all hearings, the accused will have the right to be present at all times during the hearing except when the committee retires to deliberate and make its decision. Evidence shall be admitted without regard to the rules of evidence in courts of law. The accused student may present evidence to the committee. After thorough review of the case, a majority vote of committee members to the effect that plagiarism has been committed will suffice for a finding of guilt. If the student is found guilty, the committee may decide one or more of the following actions or such other action as the committee deems appropriate:

  1. Award a grade of “F” for the course
  2. Suspend the student for the rest of the semester or longer
  3. Discontinue the student from school Upon review of the committee’s recommendations, the academic dean will notify the student of the committee’s decision and may notify university authorities of that action.

Appeal

A student who wishes to appeal the decision of the ad hoc committee must make such a request in writing to the dean of the Candler School of Theology. The appeal must be made within thirty days of the faculty and academic dean’s notification to the student. In the letter to the dean of the school, the student must indicate the reasons for the appeal and supply any relevant documents supporting the appeal.

After reviewing the request for appeal, the dean of the school may deny the request for an appeal, may render a new decision in the case, or may increase or decrease the severity of the action taken. The dean of the school will render a final decision on the appeal and inform the student of his or her decision.

Minutes will be kept of informal and formal proceedings. After resolution of the matter, minutes will be made anonymous and kept to ensure consistency of practice.

Student Conduct

Candler School of Theology requires all members of its community to conduct themselves with dignity and integrity and in conformity with the established policies and standards of Emory University and Candler School of Theology.

Student Conduct Violations

Student conduct violations consist of but are not limited to the following actions.

  1. Dishonesty through misrepresentation or withholding of pertinent factual information in a student’s personal dealings with other students, faculty, or staff of the university or organizations or agencies of the university, including Contextual Education, Candler Advantage, Teaching Parish, Episcopal Studies, or other internship placements. This also includes falsification of information for the purpose of admission to the School of Theology.
  2. Infractions of rules and regulations established by any appropriate university authority for the purpose of protecting the interests of the university community.
  3. Violations of the university Sexual Misconduct Policy (http://policies.emory.edu/8.2) and the university Discriminatory Harassment Policy (http://policies.emory.edu/1.3)
  4. Infractions of public law. Conduct that is the basis for an allegation or charge of violation of public law may also subject a student to an allegation of a student conduct violation. Candler School of Theology reserves the right to proceed with deciding the matter of such an alleged student conduct violation without awaiting the disposition of any criminal charges by a court of law.
  5. Actions contrary to the standards of Candler School of Theology and Emory University, including actions that are deliberately demeaning to other human beings or that violate the dignity and integrity of other members of the university.

Procedures for Adjudicating Student Conduct Code Violations

Allegations regarding sexual misconduct will be reported immediately to Emory’s Title IX coordinator for students and will be adjudicated according to Emory University’s Sexual Misconduct Policy, Policy 8.2 (http://policies.emory.edu/8.2). All other alleged breaches of nonacademic student conduct should be reported in writing to Associate Dean Anne Burkholder, who will conduct a preliminary investigation of the alleged violation. The associate dean will decide if there is prima facie evidence of a possible conduct code violation and whether the case should be resolved using the informal process. The student involved can select immediately for the formal process.

Informal Process

The associate dean, and whomever the associate dean deems appropriate, will review the facts of the conduct violation and may decide one or more of the following actions:

  1. Issue the student a warning.
  2. Issue the student a “no contact” letter.
  3. Place the student on probation.
  4. Suspend the student for the rest of the semester or longer.
  5. Dismiss the student from school.

If the action is agreeable to the student, the process ends here. The student is notified of the agreement in writing. Failure to achieve consensus warrants the formal process outlined as follows.

Formal Process

The case will be heard by an ad hoc committee chaired by a faculty member (selected by the Associate Dean Anne Burkholder and who shall not be the student’s faculty adviser). Other members of this ad hoc committee will consist of the associate dean, a second faculty member (selected by the associate dean in consultation with the student whose case is being heard and the assistant dean of student life and spiritual formation), the president of the Candler Coordinating Council, and a second student (selected by the associate dean in consultation with the student whose case is being heard and the assistant dean of student life and spiritual formation). Students serving on this ad hoc committee must be in good standing with Candler. The registrar will be a nonvoting member of the committee.

If such a committee is appointed, the chairperson will inform the accused person in writing of the charges against him/her, the name(s) of those who reported the charges, and the date, time, and place of the hearing on these charges. The accused will be allowed a reasonable time to prepare a defense and will be granted the privilege of an adviser to be chosen by the student from the Candler faculty. The adviser shall assist the student in the process.

In all hearings, the accused will have the right to be present at all times during the hearing except when the committee retires to deliberate and makes its decision. Evidence shall be admitted without regard to the rules of evidence in courts of law. The accused student may present evidence to the committee.

After thorough review of the case, the committee will decide whether the accused is guilty or not guilty of the charges. A majority vote of the committee will suffice for a finding of guilt. If the person is found guilty, the committee may recommend one or more of the following actions, or such other action as the committee deems appropriate:

  1. Issue the student a warning.
  2. Issue the student a “no contact” letter.
  3. Place the student on probation.
  4. Suspend the student for the rest of the semester or longer.
  5. Dismiss the student from school.

Upon review of the committee’s recommendations, the associate dean will notify the student in writing of such action and may notify university authorities of that action.

Appeal of Decisions Regarding Conduct Violations

A student who wishes to appeal the decision of the ad hoc committee must make such a request in writing to the dean of the Candler School of Theology. The appeal must be made within thirty days of the associate dean’s notification to the student. In the letter to the dean of the school, the student must indicate the reasons for the appeal and supply any relevant documents supporting the appeal.

After reviewing the request for appeal, the dean of the school may deny the request for an appeal, may render a new decision in the case, or may increase or decrease the severity of the action taken. The dean of the school will render a final decision on the appeal and inform the student of his or her decision.

Procedural Note: Minutes will be kept of informal and formal proceedings. After resolution of the matter, minutes will be made anonymous and kept to ensure consistency of practice.

Professional Integrity

Professional integrity for theological students is defined by the standards of integrity common to all professions and is further specified by those virtues of character required by Christian ministry. A person of integrity acts in a way that is congruent with what is professed in words and intended in thought, displays especially the virtues of truth and fairness, exhibits a consistent character over time, and takes responsibility for his or her actions.

Summer Term

Summer courses are offered for students enrolled in degree programs and for others, including pastors interested in continuing education. Complete courses as well as shortterm seminars and workshops are offered. For MRPL degree candidates, enrollment during the summer is limited to 6 hours for the degree. For MRL and MTS degree candidates, enrollment during the summer is limited to 12 credit hours, and a maximum of 12 hours from summer terms may be applied to the degree. For MDiv degree candidates, enrollment during the summer is limited to 12 credit hours, and a maximum of 15 hours from summer terms may be applied to the degree. Generally, students may not register for more than one 3-hour course per term for the summer semester. For complete course information, enrollment forms, and registration dates, consult the summer school schedule available from the registrar’s office early in the spring semester.

Tobacco-free Environment

http://policies.emory.edu/4.113

Emory University recognizes the serious health implications of both direct use of tobacco products and indirect exposure to the use of tobacco products. In order to create an atmosphere that is consistent with Emory’s mission and commitment to improve the health and wellness of members of the Emory community, Emory University and Emory Healthcare (collectively “Emory”) prohibit the use or sale of tobacco products in or on Emory-owned or Emory-leased property effective January 1, 2012.

Transfer of Credit

General Guidelines

To receive transfer credit to any Candler program, eligible coursework must meet the guidelines below in addition to any program-specific guidelines.

  • Academic work more than seven years old at the time of matriculation will not be applied toward any Candler degree.
  • Academic work for which another degree or certificate has already been granted cannot be transferred and applied toward any Candler degree.
  • Transfer credit will be reviewed only from schools accredited by the Association of Theological Schools or other regionally accredited universities where the student has studied religion at the graduate level.
  • Transfer credit does not affect the Emory grade point average.
  • Accepted transfer credit hours are included in the attempted hours total for scholarship purposes.
  • Advanced standing with transfer credit for students enrolling in the MDiv program may be granted on a case-by-case basis according to the Association of Theological Schools guidelines.
  • A minimum grade of B, i.e., 3.0 on a scale of 4.0 (84 or above on a numerical scale), is required for transfer credit.

MDiv Transfer Credit

In addition to the general guidelines listed above, the following guidelines apply for the transfer of credit into the MDiv program.

  • A maximum of 26 transfer credit hours may be granted toward the MDiv degree program, with the approval of the registrar.
  • A maximum of 12 transfer credit hours may be applied toward the Common Courses.
  • A maximum of 14 credit hours may be applied towards other course requirements excluding Common Courses, Contextual Education, and the First Year Advising Group.
  • Specifically required courses, such as OT501, OT502, NT501, NT502, HC501, ST501, ES501, and P501 may not be completed through cross-registration at other Atlanta Theological Association institutions.
  • Under special circumstances, international students may be granted transfer credit with the approval of the associate dean of faculty and academic affairs.
  • Supervised field experience done at other seminaries ordinarily will not be granted transfer credit at Candler. The director of contextual education will, upon request of the student, consider exceptional cases. If transfer credit is granted for field experience, it is for elective credit only. Field experience will not satisfy the requirement for Candler’s Contextual Education program.

MRL Transfer Credit

In addition to the general guidelines listed above, the following guidelines apply for the transfer of credit into the MRL program.

  • A maximum of 15 transfer credit hours may be granted toward the MRL program, with the approval of the registrar.
  • A maximum of 6 hours may be applied toward the area of specialization.
  • The specifically required courses, SR/CC515. Methods of Social and Congregational Analysis, ST501. Systematic Theology, and ES501. Christian Ethics, may not be completed through cross registration at Atlanta Theological Association institutions and normally will not be transferred from ATS or other accredited schools.
  • Supervised field education done at other seminaries ordinarily will not be granted transfer credit and may not be used to fulfill the MRL Contextual Experience (Ministry Internship) requirement.

MRPL Transfer Credit

In addition to the general guidelines listed above, the following guidelines apply for the transfer of credits into the MRPL program.

  • A maximum of 6 transfer credit hours may be granted toward the MRPL degree program, with the approval of the registrar.
  • Students who transfer to the MRPL program from other Candler programs may have more than 6 hours considered for transfer on a case-by-case basis in consultation with the registrar and the director of the MRPL program.

MTS Transfer Credit

In addition to the general guidelines listed above, the following guidelines apply for the transfer of credit into the MTS program.

  • A maximum of 17 transfer credit hours may be granted toward the MTS degree program, with the approval of the registrar.
  • MDiv or Special Students who transfer to the MTS program may transfer up to twenty-six hours of coursework completed satisfactorily toward the MTS program. In such a case, Contextual Education I and II credits will be counted as free elective credit.

ThM Transfer Credit

In addition to the general guidelines listed above, the following guidelines apply for the transfer of credit into the ThM program.

  • A maximum of three semester hours (either one academic course or one-half unit of Clinical Pastoral Education) may be granted transfer credit toward the ThM degree program, with the approval of the director of general and advanced studies. Applications for CPE credit must be reviewed as well by the director of contextual education.

ThD Transfer Credit

In addition to the general guidelines listed above, the following guidelines apply for the transfer of credit into the ThD program.

  • ThD candidates may transfer a maximum of twelve semester hours from accredited institutions not related to the ATA, with the approval of their primary adviser, the ATA ThD program director, and Candler’s registrar.
  • Students may transfer credit from accredited institutions outside the ATA with the approval of their adviser and the director of the program. Students must pay tuition and fees to the school where the work is done and must arrange for transcripts to be sent to Candler’s Office of Advanced Studies prior to the acceptance of coursework for advanced credit.

Refer to the ThD handbook for additional details.

Undergraduate Coursework

With the exception of modern language study (see Modern Language policy on page 105), MDiv, MRL, MRPL, MTS, and ThM students who take a course at the undergraduate level through Emory College require additional work agreed upon by the student and instructor to meet graduate-level course requirements. Instructor permission is required for enrollment in the course. Refer to the Undergraduate Course Registration Request Form on the Candler Registrar’s website for additional information: http://candler.emory.edu/academics/registrar/forms.html.

University-Student Relationships

The Board of Trustees of Emory University has adopted a statement of policy dealing with university-student relationships, a digest of which follows.

  1. Emory University was founded on Christian principles by the Methodist Church and proudly continues its church relationship as an agency dedicated to seeking and imparting truth.
  2. Emory University admits qualified students of any sex, sexual orientation, race, religion, color, national origin, age, disability, or veteran’s status to all of the rights, privileges, programs, and activities generally accorded or made available to students at Emory University. The university does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, religion, sex, sexual orientation, age, disability, or veteran’s status in administration of its educational policies, admissions policies, scholarship and loan programs, athletic programs, and other university-administered programs.
  3. Attendance at Emory University is a privilege and not a right. However, no student will be dismissed except in accordance with prescribed procedures. Students applying for admission do so voluntarily and are free to withdraw at their pleasure, subject to compliance with the regulations of their school or college governing withdrawal and to the fulfillment of their financial obligations to the university.
  4. Upon matriculation at Emory, each student agrees to be bound by the rules, policies, procedures, and administrative regulations existing at the time of admission and as may be changed by duly constituted authority.
  5. By admission as a student at Emory University, a person acquires the right to pursue the course of study to which he or she is admitted, and to be treated with the dignity appropriate to an adult person in all matters relating to the university. In the same spirit, the student shall comply with the rules and regulations of Emory University.
  6. Students will be provided the opportunity to participate in the development of rules and procedures pertaining to university affairs to the extent that such participation and the results thereof, as determined by the board of trustees or its designated agent, are consistent with orderly processes and with the policies and administrative responsibilities of the board of trustees and the administration.
  7. The university expects students to conduct themselves with dignity, courtesy, responsibility, and integrity, and with due respect for the rights of others, realizing that sobriety and morality are not only characteristics of a mature and responsible person, but are also essential to the maintenance of a free and orderly society.
  8. Membership in and rules governing admission to student organizations shall be determined by the organizations themselves, and such rules are not required to be uniform so long as these rules do not contravene any policy established by the board of trustees.

Emory University is an educational institution, not a vehicle for political or social action. It endorses the right of dissent and protects and encourages reasonable exercise of this right by individuals within the university. Because the right of dissent is subject to abuse, the board of trustees and the president have published a statement to clarify policy concerning such abuse, a digest of which follows:

  1. Individuals associated with Emory represent a variety of viewpoints. The university fosters the free expression and interchange of differing views through oral and written discourse and logical persuasion.
  2. Dissent, to be acceptable, must be orderly and peaceful and represent constructive alternatives reasonably presented.
  3. Coercion, threats, demands, obscenity, vulgarity, obstructionism, and violence are not acceptable.
  4. Demonstrations, marches, sit-ins, or noisy protests that are designed or intended to or do disrupt normal institutional pursuits will not be permitted.
  5. Classes and routine operations will not be suspended except for reasonable cause as determined by the president.
  6. Administrators, faculty, other employees, and students are expected to abide by these standards of conduct in promoting their views, particularly dissent.
  7. Persons who are not so inclined should not become associated with Emory nor continue to be associated with Emory.
  8. Academic and administrative procedures will protect individuals in the right of free expression and provide for prompt and appropriate action against those individuals who abuse such right.

Waiting Lists

When a class reaches maximum enrollment, a waiting list will be generated and maintained by the Candler registrar. The instructor of a closed course will forward all student enrollment requests to the Candler registrar. The Candler registrar will add the students to the waiting list, maintain the list, and provide necessary follow-up communication to students if an opening in the course becomes available. Instructor permission to be overloaded into a closed class does not override the waiting list policy and will not be accepted.